And now for something truly embarrassing

This year for Christmas and Hanukkah, I packaged and mailed cards and Frango mints to my husband’s clients.

There’s a whole story about Frangos which are from the now defunct Frederick & Nelson’s department store in Seattle. They were first sold in the early 1900s, then bought out by Marshall Fields, Bon Marche and now Macy’s. When I was a young girl, my mom would take me downtown Seattle to Christmas shop and have lunch at F&N’s. The end of the festive trip would be one melt- in-your-mouth Frango mint.

I have sent Frangos to my husband’s clients for years. My project beings with getting padded flat rate Priority Mail envelopes and labels from the post office. My local post office didn’t have any and suggested that I order them online.

One day, I ran out of envelopes and since I had a miserable cold, my husband drove to another post office further away to find more envelopes. He said it was like pulling teeth to get envelopes. One employee told him that they only have envelopes if people come in with them and return them unused.

Fast forward a week, my husband is getting calls from his clients thanking him for the delicious chocolates.

Then one woman calls and said she was confused about this year’s gift.

“Why?” he asked.

“Well, there’s a beautiful card, a delicious box of chocolates — and one dirty gray sock!”

She emailed him a photo of the three items together. And yes, the sock was really dirty!

The client said “I know you must use a service to mail these. You may want to speak with your service.”

The only thing we could figure out is the sock came in an envelope from the post office that my husband went to. I would stack the envelopes and place the card and Frangos inside and then tear off the plastic strip, fold and seal. I never once thought to look inside “empty” envelopes.

If I’m not fired from Frango duty next year, I WILL look inside each envelope.

How would you have responded to the woman who received the dirty sock?

This is what a Frango box looked like when I was a child and Marshall Field bought Frederick & Nelson.

A bright spot in the midst of inflation

sofas ordered during pandemic took months to arrive
We ordered these sofas for our new house in the Fall of 2020. It took more than six months for them to arrive.

I read an article yesterday in the Wall Street Journal that said big discounts are headed our way. That would be some good news with gas over $5 a gallon and meat prices going through the roof.

In an article called Stores Have Too Much Stuff. Here’s Where They’re Slashing Prices, reporter Rachel Wolfe shares the good news that items that were popular during the pandemic and were hard to find because of supply chain issues are here two years later. The stores have too much inventory and we should expect “discounts like you’ve never seen before.”

“Retailers are getting ready to cut prices of goods that were popular during the pandemic. Expect ‘discounts like you’ve never seen before.”

The items most likely to be discounted according to the article are patio furniture and sofas — things that take up a lot of room in stores. Other items that will be slashed in price are the stay at home remote working wear like sweat pants.

Target, Walmart and Macy’s announced recently that they are starting to receive large shipments of outdoor furniture, loungewear and electronics everyone wanted, but couldn’t find, during the pandemic. 

The problem for retailers—that these goods are delayed by almost two years—could be a windfall for those in the market for sweatpants or couches. Look for prices to start dropping around July 4, analysts say.

Retailer discounts are part of an effort to get shoppers interested in buying things again as Americans shift their spending to concertseating out, and travel they missed out on. Deep discounts are expected on oversize couches, appliances and patio furniture that are more expensive for companies to store in their warehouses, analysts say. 

https://www.wsj.com/articles/stores-have-too-much-stuff-heres-where-theyre-slashing-prices-11655170243?mod=life_work_featured_strip_pos3

With the stock market tumbling, inflation sky high and the possibility of recession on it’s way — I could use some good news. However, I don’t need any of those things.

What did you want to buy but couldn’t find during the pandemic? What do you think you’d like to buy at a discount?